The Rise of the “New Normal,” Christianity Explained

It’s no surprise to us that our parents grew up in a very religious time. There were practices that were followed, traditions that were kept, and certain things you did or didn’t do. For some Christians, your parents weren’t allowed to dance, gamble, or play cards. For some Christians, your parents went to church every Sunday morning growing up. For others, your parents might have had a less strict, but still religious upbringing.

There is a phenomenon that is coming, and some see the effects of it coming into effect finally. There will come a time when the religious, firmly founded, and unwavering baby boomer generation of our parents is replaced by the curious, spiritual, and less religious millenial generation in the church. There are a group of people called Nones. When you check “none” in the religious affiliation box, it gives rise to the label, “nones.” With nones on the rise, especially in the millenial age group, the future of the church becomes even more murky.

According to the Pew Research Study from 2007-2014, Nones have risen to 23% of all adults, up 7% from 2007. The nones include two primary groups, both of which might be generally labeled “religiously unaffiliated theists”: (1) The “spiritual but not religious” and (2) the “spiritual and independently religious.” These two groups are what remains after you subtract the smaller subset of atheists and agnostics. The first group, “spiritual but not religious,” are the people who get spiritual nourishment from, let’s say, yoga, foodie excursions, beach-walking, Sufjan Stevens concerts, or extreme sports, etc. They made the front page of USA Today in 2010, with the headline: “72% of Millennials ‘more spiritual than religious.’” They are sometimes known by their nickname: “SBNR.”

In 2007, the SBNR comprised barely half of the nones. The other half of the nones are the second group above, those who identity positively with spirituality but who also practice traditional religious activities (going to church, praying, reading the Bible, etc.). But their religious activity is eclectic, independent, and inconsistent. They might attend a variety of churches or participate in a variety of religious experiences, but do not identify strongly with any single one. They are spiritual and religious, but still unaffiliated. Still, religion is still important to them.

Here are some of the findings regarding the secularizing of the nones from the research article:
-61% of all nones believe in God, down from 70% in 2007.
-20% pray daily, down from 22% in 2007.
-13% believe religion is very important, down from 16% in 2007.
-9% attend services weekly, down from 10% in 2007. (not a big dip, but at this point you can’t get a whole lot lower).

The NEW NORMAL is going to be what the church looks like without our parents generation running it, but with us in leadership positions, teaching positions, mentorship positions, etc. Again, this has already begun in some areas. We are a questioning generation, not quick to believe, and fast to criticize. We are a generation burned by religion and the rule of religious law. We’ve been excommunicated, cast out, scolded, shamed, lectured, and gossiped to by the very people that are supposed to exercise humility, wisdom, patience, forgiveness, love, and Godliness. In our figuring out what we believe, whether in college or afterwards, some now have a loose grip on correct theology, gospel truth, or giftings in the spirit. They make statements like, “The Bible was written by men and can’t really be trusted fully as the, “exact words of God.” or, “I can’t believe that the God I know would let people perish, so I believe everyone will be able to enjoy Heaven.” or, “How do we know that other religions aren’t also speaking truth? How can we assume that we have the only truth? Doesn’t that seem presumptuous?”

Many Millenials have been trying to figure out their spiritual identity for years. According to the Pew Research Center, “The phrase ‘spiritual but not religious’ has become widely used in recent years by some Americans who are trying to describe their religious identity.” According to Pew, religious activities such as attendance to a church, prayer, meeting in small groups, are on a decline. Still, feeling a deep sense of spiritual peace and well-being as well as a deep sense of wonder about the universe is on the rise.

Is this something to be concerned with? Do we find a balance between the popular act of  casting out religion and just following Christ? In our pursuit to find knowledge and know how to truly live out a Christ centered life, have we lost some things along the way? Or are we better off than where we were in our parents generation? Have we corrected the sins of what religion did to our faith? Was the key to loose religion and the law that ruled it?

Progressive Christianity is a form of Christianity which is characterized by a willingness to question tradition, acceptance of human diversity, a strong emphasis on social justice and care for the poor and the oppressed, and environmental stewardship of the Earth.

A definition that encapsulates the point. Progressive…a need to reform, favoring and promoting change or innovation. Yet, arguably, we should have already cared about these things. This shouldn’t be radical. This shouldn’t be Progressive.

SOURCES

Masci, David, and Michael Lipka. “Americans May Be Getting Less Religious, but Feelings of Spirituality Are on the Rise.” Pew Research Center. N.p., 21 Jan. 2016. Web. 14 Mar. 2017.

“The Future of Christianity and the “Nones”: Still Rising, Still Spiritual, More Secular.” Unsystematic Theology. N.p., 04 Nov. 2015. Web. 14 Mar. 2017.

First Christmas Back

It’s been some time since I’ve been able to have a white Christmas with my family. For the past three years, Christmas has been 90 degrees, shorts, sand, some sunscreen, your jandals, and a bach to hang with your friends in. Paradise, some of you may be thinking right about now. Well, I found these versions of Christmas to be rather…unfulfilled. Where’s the snow? Where’s the pine tree? Where are the snowmen? Why do ALL Christmas songs feel so hollow when heard on a tropical Island? Continue reading “First Christmas Back”

Where is God in Senseless Death? Explained.

If you’re a Christian, you’ve most likely heard this question or sweat through a half-sense, convoluted attempt at an answer. Don’t worry. Everyone wants to know the answer and very few can offer a consoling response. You’re not alone in the slightest. In fact, I would wager that nearly everyone has asked this to themselves, or out loud while screaming, fists raised to the sky, whether you’re a Christian or not. Continue reading “Where is God in Senseless Death? Explained.”

Advent Season Explained

Adventus. In Latin, this word sums up the entire Advent Season. The word’s meaning, “coming,” is the anticipatory practice for most western Christians in terms of both the coming of Christ into the world and the eventual coming of His kingdom to this Earth.

Taking place on the Sunday between November 27th and December 3rd, Advent Season today last for four Sundays leading up to Christmas and is the beginning of the Liturgical Calendar for Christians. Continue reading “Advent Season Explained”

A Letter to Three Mothers

Happy-Mother-Day-Coloring-Pages

This year, I have been extra aware of the mother figures in my life. Reason being, my mother is over 8,000 miles away by sea and by land. In addition to my mother, my two beautiful sisters, who really have this whole motherhood thing down, are also in Chicago. (Seriously, I know no cooler moms). Other than Debbie Elliott, who has been my surrogate mother while being in New Zealand, the three coolest women in my life have been the best, most accurate examples of what God’s love for others truly means. Continue reading “A Letter to Three Mothers”