The Adventures of Booker & Bishop

Hello again. I am writing to let you know that I have written a short story. ANOTHER ONE!! I have really loved writing these stories and I thought I’d share this one with you. This is a long one. Yeah. Still. If you have some time, and like my writing, I would encourage you to check it out. This is like Indiana Jones meets The Hardy Boys. I loved writing the characters and jumping into their world. I drew from my love of this genre in story and in film. So. That’s all. Have fun. Here is an excerpt from the story, but for the full story, click the link below the excerpt.

“Do you have the key with you?”

“Yes we do,” Bishop said without making an indication of its proximity.

“May I see it?”

The two looked at each other hesitantly, but ultimately, this was why they had come to Zurich in the first place. Bishop took the box out of his pocket and handed it to the professor. Griffin took the key to a room in the back of the apartment. He turned on a light connected to a slanted table and began to work. Booker pulled on Bishop’s arm,

“Hey, if those guys find out where this guy lives, and I’m sure they already know, then we may be out of time.” Griffin seemed to have heard them,

“I received that email at work, not from my home address, but yes. We don’t have much time.”

A short time later, Griffin returned from the back room with the key in his open palm,

“Do you know what this is?”

“Are you asking or do you know?” Booker tried to be funny.

Bishop responded to Griffin’s question, “Professor Hyland told us that it was very old and might predate the Greeks.”

Griffin smiled, “He was right…but he was only half right,” Griffin’s eyes widened as he walked to the empty chair. Booker and Bishop followed him. Griffin started up again,

“I have to admit, I have never seen anything like this before. The key is reminiscent of some of the earliest cultures ever documented, and yet it is unique unto itself. It is almost as if culture and civilization’s Genesis were from this very artifact,” Griffin paused to let this sink in, “After some digging and cross-referencing, I noticed the key’s designs were similar to a set of Spanish hieroglyphs found a very long time ago.”

“Professor…” Bishop started

“Stop that, call me Griffin.”

“Sorry. Griffin, the Spanish never had hieroglyphs. What civilization ever existed in that region that used hieroglyphs?”

“Ahh. This is where books are no use to you and where myth plays a very heavy role.”

The Adventures of Booker & Bishop: And THE LOST DOOR

admin-ajax

Writing for Another Part II

So, some of you know that I write. Yeah, I know. Shocker. Most of you know that I like to write different kinds of things, not just blogs. I enjoy branching out creatively and experiencing the joy when writing in an untested medium…at least for myself.

Not many of you know that I write for another blog, called How We Lost the Moon. There, writers, experienced and novice find a voice. You can write whatever you want. If you’ve been wanting to write a short story, but didn’t feel confident publishing it, this site will publish the work and the audience will accept it. It’s a safe place to experiment in your writing. I started writing poetry when I was a teenager, then in college my good friend David started a writing group where we shared our writing. Then I got into blogging and loved that format. HWLTM was the first place that I tried to write a short story. Once I tried it, I loved it. I couldn’t get enough of it. The stories I write are getting longer and longer now, ha. I am a huge advocate for the cathartic release that writing can give a person, and I will always encourage people who are shy about their writing to take a step of faith.

This month on HWLTM, they are running a contest. It’s a Blue Moon Contest. The rules are to write about a famous painting. My piece is called “A Self Portrait in Retrospect,” written on the painting “The Wanderer Above a Sea of Fog,” which happens to be my favorite painting. The rules are also this: Like the post you want to win. The Like button is located at the bottom of the post and is a button with a star in it. Mobile versions of the website might have more trouble, I hear, so sorry.

Thank you for reading my blog and for enjoying what I do here. If you enjoy my post that I mentioned above, keep an eye on the website for a new short story that I will be publishing within a few weeks called, “The Adventures of Booker and Bishop: And The Lost Door.”

Thank You.

Screen Shot 2015-07-10 at 10.41.14 pm

Dating. A Dying Art form.

carnival fair themed engagement couple shoot

This post has been a long time coming.

Lately, and especially with my 26th birthday now under my belt, I have been doing a lot of thinking about my past. This included talking about my successes and my failings. One area that my mind drifted to recently was Dating.

With chasing down a Master’s degree right after getting my Bachelors degree, cramming my education into half of the time, in order to finish early, and leaving the country to live in New Zealand…it’s no surprise that I didn’t have much time to go on dates. Very few in fact.

Dating is fun. Plain and simple. It is an opportunity to have a lot fun with the opposite sex, with the possibility of that first date turning into a longer, more meaningful relationship. Dinner, movie, and ice cream. Walks, drinks, and star-gazing. A drive, conversation, and an out-of-the-way adventure. However you design the date, it’s a fun time. That being said, don’t go overboard. You can absolutely do too much in a date. If you’re unsure, vet your plans with friends you trust. Additionally, not all dates go the way that you planned. I know that territory, ha. Once I was on a date and didn’t even know it. Talk about awkward.

And that segues perfectly into my point. Dating, as I have come to notice in New Zealand, is a passive game. (DISCLAIMER: I am speaking from my perspective and accounts told to me by women here in NZ, as well as some men. If you feel you are not one of these men I am describing, feel free to tell the world and comment below. Also, prepare for some massive over-generalizations.) Young men in NZ can sometimes take the back seat and fail to commit when it comes to dating. “But asking someone out is dangerous, risky, and scary.” Yeah. It is. But taking months to even ask her out on a proper date can most times be exhausting for the women. Assertiveness goes a long way.

To that effect, when you’re going on a date, make sure it’s actually a proper date. When I told you earlier that I didn’t know I was on a date, I was 18, and it was a group event. Being young, I must have missed something. I learned from that horrible awkward night and made sure to treat dating differently. First off: Groups. Okay for the first few times, but eventually you have to take a leap. Also, Dating should not be a random coffee meet-up, or haphazardly pulled romantic-dates-a-dinner-to-remembertogether. That makes things confusing. An intentional, thought out, Yes, possibly even risky planned night eliminates the need for awkward conversations where you are trying to define your relationship. It’s brave. It’s assertive. And most of all, It shows you care about the person.

Like I’ve said before; going out with someone, even if it doesn’t turn into a second date, can be fantastic. Don’t hold on so tight to the result. Just be yourself and enjoy each others company.

I have to tell you, I missed out on opportunities to date while getting my professional degrees. It happens. Some opportunities couldn’t be helped. But others I wish I would have taken advantage of. Now I’m going to say something that I usually wouldn’t say because of how it could be taken out of context, and maybe it’s because I’m getting older…slightly, but we’re only young for so long. Enjoy the opportunities you have to get to know someone new, until you find the person who doesn’t make you sad that you stopped dating.

Call me a traditionalist, but there are times when I feel like the kind of dating that I have been talking about is on its way out the front door. Chivalry and kindness. Bravery and courage.  Boldness and fervor. Dating can be an art if you treat it like one. Men, women, I plead with you. Reform how we date each other, and I promise you, not only will you have a lot of fun, but they will respect you above the coffee date. I mean…I really hope they do.

500-days-of-summer-joseph-gordon-levitt-couple-ice-cream-Favim.com-536373